“Adore”: Prom Queens, bootstraps and a slow letting go

“Adore.”

It leaves a bad taste in my mouth, this word “adore.” It’s starry-eyed princesses with tiny waists and big eyes expecting to be fawned over. It’s weak men eyeing the prom queen because she has a social cache that he wants. It means giving our power to another.

And honestly, that feels weak.

It means I’m not a pull-yourself-up-by-your bootstraps person. It means that I don’t have this whole thing all figured out. It means that I’m not in control.

And then, comes the fear.

If I don’t have power, if I don’t have control, then what? If properly-given adoration — not improperly like the examples above connote –means a giving up, do I really “adore” God? Do I bend the knee like the three kings, laying down my wealth and status and reputation? Or do I clench tightly to my well-worn leather boots and say (in the voice of my toddler son): that I can do it myself?

It’s only in trading in those boots for something more humble that we’ll begin to walk slowly in the direction of adoration. Slowly pacing towards a slow giving up, again and again — a laying down, an open-handedness — we’ll creep towards adoration as a giving up instead of a power grab.

 

__

Five-minute Friday is a writing prompt where you write (no editing) in 5 minutes. This is the last prompt for the year. Visit Kate Montaung’s blog to read some other great writers and what they came up with.

Advertisements

7 Comments

  1. You words resonate with me. Openhandedness and laying down are really submission words. I want to think I might sometimes give my Savior those gifts. Thank-you for writing.

    Like

    Reply

    1. Thanks for reading and commenting Gabriele. Yes they are submission words. Sometimes that’s scary, isn’t it? And it’s wise of you to note that sometimes we can properly give those gifts to a God who deserves it. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

      Reply

    1. That is so true Anita. I think we all oscillate between wanting to do it my way and the richness that comes from open-handedness. Thanks for reading and chatting on Twitter! 🙂

      Like

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s